Scoliosis
 

The goal is to prevent the curve from getting worse until the person stops growing. Since the curve starts early in these people, and they have a lot of time left to grow, there is a higher chance for needing more aggressive treatment or surgery.
Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is the most common form of scoliosis. If the curve is small when first diagnosed, it can be observed and followed with routine X-rays and measurements. If the curve stays below 25 degrees, no other treatment is needed. If the curve is between 25-40 degrees, a brace may be recommended. If the curve is greater than 40 degrees, then surgery may be recommended.
As explained above, scoliosis is not typically associated with back pain. In cases with back pain, the symptoms can be lessened with physical therapy, massage, and exercises, including yoga. These can help to strengthen the muscles of the back. They are not, however, a cure for scoliosis and will not be able to correct the abnormal curve.
There are several different types of braces available for scoliosis. Some need to be worn nearly 24 hours a day and are removed only for showering. Others can be worn only at night. The ability of a brace to work depends on the person following the instructions from the doctor and wearing the brace as directed. Braces are not designed to correct the curve. They are used to help slow or stop the curve from getting worse.
If the curve stays below 40 degrees until the person is finished growing, it is not likely to get worse later in life. However, if the curve is greater than 40 degrees, it is likely to continue to get worse by 1-2 degrees each year for the rest of the person's life. If this is not prevented, the person will eventually be at risk for heart or lung problems.
If a tumor such as osteoid osteoma is the cause of the scoliosis, surgery to remove the tumor is generally able to correct the curve.
People with degenerative scoliosis will often have more complaints of back and leg pain. This is related to the arthritis in the back and possible compression of the nerve roots that lead to the legs. Nonoperative treatment including physical therapy, exercises, and gentle chiropractic can help relieve these symptoms in some cases. People who fail to improve with these treatments may benefit from surgery. X-rays and possible MRIs will be obtained to plan for surgery. The surgery could include only a decompression or removal of bone spurs that are compressing the nerves. In some cases, a fusion will be necessary to stabilize the spine and possibly correct the abnormal curve.

 

 

 

appointment appointment